Schlagwort: ebooks

Intel hat speziellen eReader für Blinde und Sehbehinderte entwickelt

Das Besondere an dem eReader ist unter anderem, dass man damit Bücher abfotografieren kann und die Bilddaten werden dann in ASCII-Text umgewandelt und laut vorgelesen. Das Tempo ist frei einstellbar. Dafür ist er mit $ 1.499 aber auch ziemlich teuer. Die Kurzbeschreibung:

The Intel Reader takes pictures of text and read it aloud. It’s designed to provide access to printed text for people with dyslexia, low vision or blindness. Intel’s Digital Health Group researched and designed the mobile Intel Reader, which is built on the Intel Atom processor and run on the Moblin operating system.

Video (4 min.):

 

Neben der Möglichkeit, Blinden und Sehbehinderten auf diesem Wege einen unschätzbaren Dienst zu erweisen, müssten solche Geräte auch immer besser dazu geeignet sein, um Bücher einfach „nur“ selbst zu digitalisieren. Zumindest schreibt Ubergizmo:

It has a camera that can translate text in pictures into ASCII text that can be read out loud by the computer (thanks to an Optical Character Recognition, or OCR, engine). In some ways, it is a new „eye“ for those who can’t see. Of course, it is possible to download text documents (simple text files, no complex files like .PDF or .DOC) or audio files (.wav) on the device.

Mehr Informationen zum Intel Reader gibt es bei VentureBeat.

3 kostenlose Bücher über Communities, Piraterie und Steuerverschwendung

The Art of Community
(PDF; 2,2 MB)
Autor/Herausgeber: Jono Bacon
Erscheinungsjahr: 2009
 
When I started work on ‚The Art of Community‘ I was really keen that it should be a body of work that all communities have access to. My passion behind the book was to provide a solid guide to building, energizing and enabling pro-active, productive and enjoyable communities. I wanted to write a book that covered the major areas of community leadership, distilling a set of best practices and experiences, and illustrated by countless stories, anecdotes and tales.
 

The Pirate’s Dilemma
Autor/Herausgeber: Matt Mason
Erscheinungsjahr: 2008
 
‚The Pirate’s Dilemma‘ tells the story of how youth culture drives innovation and is changing the way the world works. It offers understanding and insight for a time when piracy is just another business model, the remix is our most powerful marketing tool and anyone with a computer is capable of reaching more people than a multi-national corporation.
 

37. Schwarzbuch des Bundes der Steuerzahler – Die öffentliche Verschwendung
Autor/Herausgeber: Bund der Steuerzahler
Erscheinungsjahr: 2009
 
Wie jedes Jahr erfasst der Bund der Steuerzahler 2009 in seinem „Schwarzbuch“ Fälle öffentlicher Steuergeldverschwendung. Verschwendung von Steuergeld zeigt sich in verschiedenen Formen. Da geht es um Fehlplanungen und Kostenexplosionen, Mängel im Beschaffungswesen, Reisen und Empfänge auf Steuerzahlerkosten, aber auch um Gedanken- und Planlosigkeit beim Umgang mit den sauer verdienten Steuern der Bürger. Und schließlich führen auch die Auswüchse der Staatsbürokratie nicht selten zu einer massiven Fehlleitung öffentlicher Mittel.
 

 

Mehr kostenlose Bücher:
9 kostenlose E-Books zu den Themen Internet, Medien und Wirtschaft

 

Pixel Qi zeigt erste Exemplare seiner wegweisenden Bildschirme

Eine große Herausforderung für Hersteller von E-Readern ist aus meiner Sicht nach wie vor die Tatsache, dass sie die Menschen (im Massenmarkt) davon überzeugen müssen, ein weiteres Gerät zu kaufen und mit sich herumzutragen. Dabei tragen wir alle – zumindest gefühlt – schon viel zu viel Technik mit uns herum: Handy, Laptop, MP3-Spieler usw. Ich habe mir daher schon immer gewünscht, man möge die E-Ink-Technologie der E-Reader einfach alternativ auf den Geräten anbieten, die wir ohnehin schon nutzen.

Daher hatte ich Anfang Mai auf eine neue und aus meiner Sicht sehr vielversprechende Technik des Unternehmens Pixel Qi hingewiesen:

Neue Technologie von Pixel Qi erspart uns hoffentlich separate E-Book-Reader

Über Pixel Qi

Mary Lou Jepsen war der Gründungs-CTO bei One Laptop per Child (OLPC), einer Non-Profit-Organisation, die Kindern in Entwicklungsländern möglichst billige Laptops zur Verfügung stellen will. Zu Beginn des Jahres 2008 hat Jepsen OLPC jedoch verlassen, um das For-Profit-Unternehmen Pixel Qi zu gründen. Bei Wikipedia sind Jepsens damit verbundenen Ziele beschrieben:

After 3 years with OLPC, In early 2008 she left OLPC to start a for-profit company, Pixel Qi, to commercialize some of the technologies she invented at OLPC. Her premise: the CPU is no longer important, nor is the operating system. Portables are all about the screen. Typical laptop screens run for about $100 (compared to the CPU which at the low end has hit $10), cause the largest drain on the battery, are difficult to read for hours on end, don’t have integated touchscreens and electronics, and aren’t sunlight readable. She has started a new company, Pixel Qi, to move forward on screen innovations in these areas using the existing LCD factories as is, but with clever conceptual design changes that allow her company to move from idea to high volume mass production in less than a year, as she did with the screen for the OLPC laptop.

Eines der geplanten Produkte ist ein Bildschirm, der genau die zumindest von mir gewünschte Kombination der Eigenschaften von LCD und E-Ink-Technologie bieten soll, zwischen denen man je nach Bedarf hin und her wechseln kann. Dieser Bildschirm soll bereits Ende 2009 in Massenproduktion lieferbar sein:

Our first screens will be 10″ diagonal screens for netbooks and ebook readers that will sample in mid-2009 and ship in high volume in late 2009. These screens rival the best epaper displays on the market today but in addition have video refresh and fully saturated color. The epaper mode has 3 times the resolution of the fully saturated color mode allowing for a high resolution reading experience without sacrifice to super color fidelity for graphics. In addition these screens can be used in sunlight. Look for them in the market in the second half of 2009.

Entwicklung seit Anfang Mai

Seit meinem Beitrag von Anfang Mai hat sich eine Menge getan. Ende Mai/Anfang Juni wurden die ersten Exemplare der Bildschirme gefertigt und präsentiert. Bei Time.com wurde das wie folgt kommentiert:

Pixel Qi’s Killer Display is the Future of E-Reading

Mary Lou had a pair of off-the-shelf Acer laptops that she had purchased at Radio Shack. Her team modded them with the new, 10-inch Pixel Qi screens for demo purposes; a jerry-rigged switch, on the side of the screen, allows you to switch between emissive mode—similar to the typical, flashlight-in-your-eyes LCD display—and reflective mode, which rivaled E Ink. Actually, it was better than E Ink: My Kindle only handles 167 DPI (the measure of dot pitch, or crispness of the font); the Pixel Qi, Mary Lou said, does 205 DPI.

In black and white, reflective mode, I couldn’t see any difference when we held up the Kindle alongside the PQ-modded Netbook. Both were easy to read without any flicker or speckling. Color on the Pixel Qi was like color on an LCD, which, I guess, it is. That’s the killer app, right there, of course. Good news for the magazine business!

John Ryan, COO und VP of Sales and Marketing bei Pixel Qi, stellt in diesem Video (13 min.) die ersten Exemplare detailliert vor:

Weiteres Video (4 min.) mit ersten Eindrücken:

via: Mary Lou Jepsen’s Blog, jkkmobile, techvideoblog.com

D&M Publishers experimentiert mit kostenlosem E-Book als Marketinginstrument

Im März 2009 hat die Marketing-Abteilung des kanadischen Verlags D&M Publishers ein Experiment gewagt und das Buch Tar Sands – Dirty Oil and the Future of a Continent als kostenloses PDF zum Download bereitgestellt. Damit verband der Verlag folgende vier Ziele:

  1. To have as many people as possible download the book
  2. To increase traffic on our site
  3. To increase sales
  4. To establish Greystone Books as a leading environmental publisher through the development of relationships with environmental bloggers and websites

Die interessanten Ergebnisse des Experiments wurden im April 2009 in einem Bericht zusammengefasst, der hier abrufbar ist:

Tar Sands Online Marketing Campaign – Report (PDF, 180 KB)

Am Ende konnte folgendes Fazit gezogen werden:

To conclude, we’ve deemed that all goals were successfully met to the degree that we were able to measure them. Overall, the campaign was an experiment in providing free content and the knowledge, contacts and web presence we gained from that has proven extremely valuable.

Eine argumentative Reaktion auf Kritikpunkte aufgebrachter Buchhändler lieferte der Verlag auch:

We are hoping that this U.S. promotion (a free PDF of Tar Sands) will help raise the profile of the book south of the border where it just released. It is limited in time to only 5 days, but it should, we hope, increase the profile of the book, especially in the blogosphere. This is a marketing experiment that has been tried by a number of publishers and we think it could create an extra buzz for Andrew’s book. I can understand why a bookseller might be nervous about it, but we too make our living selling books, so that’s our ultimate goal – to keep Tar Sands front-and-centre in the mind of the public, and to sell more copies in the U.S. and in Canada through bookstores like yours. Most people will prefer to read Tar Sands in book-form rather than in a large PDF, especially since the book is inexpensive.

via: So Misguided

E-Reader als Literatur-Ticker

Mal laut gedacht:

Ich finde es gut, dass wir bald E-Reader mit größeren Displays wie den Kindle DX bekommen. Solche Geräten werden die Stärke haben, den digitalen Content in all seiner Pracht und Größe darstellen zu können. Hier würde ich mir konsequenterweise natürlich wünschen, dass die E-Books dann mehr sind als nur 1:1-Kopien der gedruckten Werke.

Andererseits denke ich, dass es auch im Bereich des entgegengesetzten Extrems sinnvolle Alternativen geben könnte. Denn im Grunde orientieren sich die heutigen E-Reader noch immer stark am traditionellen Buch. Dieses besteht aus Papier und daher muss der auf dem Papier abgedruckte Text zwangsläufig an einer bestimmten Stelle umgebrochen werden. So ergibt sich ein Schriftbild, welchem der Leser mit seinem Auge folgt.

Mit digitalen Geräten unterliegen wir aber weniger Zwängen. Warum nehmen wir also nicht bspw. den Text eines Romans, der i.d.R. durch keinerlei Abbildungen o.ä. unterbrochen wird, und lassen ihn ähnlich wie bei einem Nachrichtenticker über den Bildschirm fließen? Das Auge könnte dadurch auf einem Punkt ruhen und nur der Text bewegte sich fort. Zudem könnte man auf diese Weise auch lange Texte auf sehr kleinen Bildschirmen lesen. Die Geschwindigkeit des Textflusses ließe sich ja durch den Leser individuell anpassen. Zudem müsste das Schriftbild und der Textfluss sehr schonend für das Auge sein. Dann aber könnte so ein Literatur-Ticker ein durchaus angenehmes Lese-Erlebnis ergeben.

Für diese Art des Lesens könnte man extra Geräte in der Größe eines kleinen MP3-Spielers anfertigen, die sehr preisgünstig und robust sein müssten. Man könnte aber auch einfach das Handy dafür nutzen. Natürlich bedürfte es eines entsprechenden augenschonenden Displays, doch die ersten Hybride zwischen E-Ink-Technologie und klassischen Bildschirmen werden ja schon zur Marktreife gebracht.

Wie gesagt, das ist nur laut gedacht. Im Zweifel gibt es Derartiges auch schon. Unabhängig von dieser konkreten Idee finde ich es nur wichtig, dass wir versuchen, uns gedanklich von der bisherigen Buchform zu lösen, um auf neue Lösungen für die Rezeption von Texten zu stoßen.

Bild: bgilliard

E-Books sollten nicht nur 1:1-Kopien von Print-Büchern sein

Alle klagen über E-Books:

Meine Ansicht dazu habe ich hier skizziert. Ich denke, dass die Kundenperspektive entscheidend ist. Andere sehen das ähnlich:

How to set e-books prices? A trained economist speaks out
In most cases, the final price of a good is determined by the perceived value of the product to the buyer, not the production cost.

Doch was tun, wenn die Kunden der Meinung sind, digitale 1:1-Kopien von gedruckten Büchern seien einen Preis „nah am Hardcover“ nicht wert? Ein sinnvoller Weg könnte sein, den Wert der E-Books zu steigern, indem man sie „anreichert“:

I daresay the idea of taking an existing print book, turning it into ASCII characters, and throwing it up on the Internet is a rather primitive concept of an e-book. The price of these offerings will rightly be driven to their marginal cost, zero. True e-book value is created by friendly and extensive navigation and search capabilities, graphics, tables, references and notes, indexing and appendices. Even greater value will be created when the reader can manipulate content and share it easily with others.

Wir sehen auch schon Akteure am Markt, die versuchen, ihre Angebote in diese Richtung zu entwickeln:

Book and Beyond – Premium ebooks from Random House
Book and Beyond premium ebooks are a selection of titles from Random House that contain extra material, which can be video, audio, a quiz or just extra text.

Penguin Enriched eBooks
The enriched format invites readers to go beyond the pages of these beloved works and gain more insight into the life and times of an author and the period in which the book was originally written—it’s a rich reading experience.

Harlequin: Enriched eBooks

 

Bild: timonoko

Was ist ein Buch?

Die UNESCO hat 1964 Folgendes als Buch definiert:

A book is a non-periodical printed publication of at least 49 pages, exclusive of the cover pages, published in the country and made available to the public

Ich denke, aufgrund der Digitalisierung und der in vielen Bereichen immer stärkeren Loslösung vom Datenträger Papier werden wir im 21. Jahrhundert eine neue oder zumindest angepasste Definition benötigen. Doch was ist eigentlich ein Buch?

Ich freue mich über Meinungen hier in den Kommentaren oder gern auch im Diskussionsforum der Facebook-Seite meines Blogs.

Bild: ellen.w

Neue Technologie von Pixel Qi erspart uns hoffentlich separate E-Book-Reader

Ein Kernproblem beim Thema E-Book-Reader à la Kindle ist aus meiner Sicht, dass man ein weiteres Gerät herumtragen soll. Der Meinung ist man auch bei TechCrunch. Dabei haben wir mit dem Handy/Smartphone sowie dem Laptop/Netbook in der Regel schon zwei Geräte, die wir mit uns durch den Alltag transportieren müssen. So angenehm die augenschonende E-Ink-Technologie auch ist – meiner Meinung nach rechtfertigt sie diesen Aufwand in vielen Fällen nicht.

Daher habe ich mir schon immer gewünscht, man möge die E-Ink-Technologie einfach alternativ auf den Geräten anbieten, die wir ohnehin schon nutzen. Vor diesem Hintergrund erscheint mir folgender Ansatz hochspannend zu sein:

Mary Lou Jepsen war der Gründungs-CTO bei One Laptop per Child (OLPC), einer Non-Profit-Organisation, die Kindern in Entwicklungsländern möglichst billige Laptops zur Verfügung stellen will. Zu Beginn des Jahres 2008 hat Jepsen OLPC jedoch verlassen, um das For-Profit-Unternehmen Pixel Qi zu gründen. Bei Wikipedia sind Jepsens damit verbundenen Ziele beschrieben:

After 3 years with OLPC, In early 2008 she left OLPC to start a for-profit company, Pixel Qi, to commercialize some of the technologies she invented at OLPC. Her premise: the CPU is no longer important, nor is the operating system. Portables are all about the screen. Typical laptop screens run for about $100 (compared to the CPU which at the low end has hit $10), cause the largest drain on the battery, are difficult to read for hours on end, don’t have integated touchscreens and electronics, and aren’t sunlight readable. She has started a new company, Pixel Qi, to move forward on screen innovations in these areas using the existing LCD factories as is, but with clever conceptual design changes that allow her company to move from idea to high volume mass production in less than a year, as she did with the screen for the OLPC laptop.

Eines der geplanten Produkte ist ein Bildschirm, der genau die zumindest von mir gewünschte Kombination der Eigenschaften von LCD und E-Ink-Technologie bieten soll, zwischen denen man je nach Bedarf hin und her wechseln kann. Dieser Bildschirm soll bereits Ende 2009 in Massenproduktion lieferbar sein:

Our first screens will be 10″ diagonal screens for netbooks and ebook readers that will sample in mid-2009 and ship in high volume in late 2009. These screens rival the best epaper displays on the market today but in addition have video refresh and fully saturated color. The epaper mode has 3 times the resolution of the fully saturated color mode allowing for a high resolution reading experience without sacrifice to super color fidelity for graphics. In addition these screens can be used in sunlight. Look for them in the market in the second half of 2009.

Dieses Video gibt einen Einblick in die Forschungsabteilung der New York Times. Nick Bilton, Design Integration Editor bei der NYT, zeigt u.a. auch den besagten Bildschirm (ab ca. 2:10). Folgendes weiß er zu berichten:

An interesting technology that is going to affect the e-book reader industry in the next year or so is the screen from the One Laptop Per Child. Mary Lou Jepsen came from One Laptop Per Child. She invented the screen, which is actually called Pixel Qi — Pixel Q-I. It’s based off the E-Ink technology and LCD, and it’s mashed together, and it creates a color version of E-Ink that you can actually switch between this LCD with full movement to E-Ink in low-light situations and low power and things like that. So she’s going to be shipping those devices, the screens in November or so which means that we’ll probably start seeing them in the market place in the next year or year and a half, which should be really interesting. (Quelle)

 

via: Nieman Journalism Lab

Kostenlose E-Books zu den Themen Internet, Medien und Wirtschaft

Remix: Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy
(PDF; 4,8 MB)
Autor/Herausgeber: Lawrence Lessig
Erscheinungsjahr: 2008
 
Lawrence Lessig, the reigning authority on intellectual property in the Internet age, spotlights the newest and possibly the most harmful culture war—a war waged against our kids and others who create and consume art. America’s copyright laws have ceased to perform their original, beneficial role: protecting artists’ creations while allowing them to build on previous creative works. In fact, our system now criminalizes those very actions.

For many, new technologies have made it irresistible to flout these unreasonable and ultimately untenable laws. Some of today’s most talented artists are felons, and so are our kids, who see no reason why they shouldn’t do what their computers and the Web let them do, from burning a copyrighted CD for a friend to “biting” riffs from films, videos, songs, etc and making new art from them.

Criminalizing our children and others is exactly what our society should not do, and Lessig shows how we can and must end this conflict—a war as ill conceived and unwinnable as the war on drugs. By embracing “read-write culture,” which allows its users to create art as readily as they consume it, we can ensure that creators get the support—artistic, commercial, and ethical—that they deserve and need. Indeed, we can already see glimmers of a new hybrid economy that combines the profit motives of traditional business with the “sharing economy” evident in such Web sites as Wikipedia and YouTube. The hybrid economy will become ever more prominent in every creative realm—from news to music—and Lessig shows how we can and should use it to benefit those who make and consume culture.

Remix is an urgent, eloquent plea to end a war that harms our children and other intrepid creative users of new technologies. It also offers an inspiring vision of the post-war world where enormous opportunities await those who view art as a resource to be shared openly rather than a commodity to be hoarded.

 
Music 2.0
(PDF; 8,1 MB)
Autor/Herausgeber: Gerd Leonhard
Erscheinungsjahr: 2008
 
Music2.0 is an inspiring and invigorating collection of Music & Media Futurist Gerd Leonhard’s best essays and blog posts on the future of the music industry. The book continues and expands on the ideas and models Gerd presented in his first book “The Future of Music” (co-written with Dave Kusek, published by Berklee Press, 2005), which has become a must-read work within the music industry, worldwide, and was translated into German, Spanish and Italian.

Music2.0 clearly describes what the next generation of music companies will actually look like; hence the use of the term Music2.0, a catch-all phrase derived from the increasingly over-used “Web 2.0.” In this book, Gerd does not mince his words when it’s about spelling things out, and his style is both engaging as well as hard-hitting and provocative.

 
The Wealth of Networks – How Social Production
Transforms Markets and Freedom

(PDF; 3,6 MB)
Autor/Herausgeber: Yochai Benkler
Erscheinungsjahr: 2006
 
With the radical changes in information production that the Internet has introduced, we stand at an important moment of transition, says Yochai Benkler in this thought-provoking book. The phenomenon he describes as social production is reshaping markets, while at the same time offering new opportunities to enhance individual freedom, cultural diversity, political discourse, and justice. But these results are by no means inevitable: a systematic campaign to protect the entrenched industrial information economy of the last century threatens the promise of today’s emerging networked information environment.

In this comprehensive social theory of the Internet and the networked information economy, Benkler describes how patterns of information, knowledge, and cultural production are changing—and shows that the way information and knowledge are made available can either limit or enlarge the ways people can create and express themselves. He describes the range of legal and policy choices that confront us and maintains that there is much to be gained—or lost—by the decisions we make today.

 
Interaktive Wertschöpfung: Open Innovation, Individualisierung und neue Formen der Arbeitsteilung
(PDF; 2,9 MB)
Autor/Herausgeber: Ralf Reichwald/Frank Piller
Erscheinungsjahr: 2006
 
Kunden sind heute nicht nur passive Empfänger und Konsumenten einer vom Hersteller dominierten Wertschöpfung. Vielmehr gestalten viele Kunden Produkte und Dienstleistungen aktiv mit und übernehmen dabei sogar teilweise deren Entwicklung und Herstellung. Diese Wertschöpfungspartnerschaft führt zu neuen Formen der Arbeitsteilung, der Koordination und Organisation von Innovations- und Produktionsprozessen. Zur Organisation arbeitsteiliger Wertschöpfung gibt es bislang zwei wesentliche Alternativen: die hierarchische Koordination im Unternehmen oder die Nutzung des Marktmechanismus über Angebot und Nachfrage. Eine Zwischenform bilden die verschiedenen Varianten von Unternehmensnetzwerken. Die interaktive Wertschöpfung bildet eine dritte Alternative: die Arbeitsteilung zwischen Herstellerunternehmen und Kunden, die zum Wertschöpfungspartner werden. Reichwald/Piller behandeln Entwicklungen wie Peer-Production, Kundeninnovation, Open-Source-Software-Entwicklung, Kunden-Communities oder Web 2.0. Anhand vieler Beispiele und Fallstudien diskutieren sie die wesentlichen Prinzipien und Ansatzpunkte, aber auch die Grenzen der interaktiven Wertschöpfung. Open Innovation und Produktindividualisierung (Mass Customization) werden als konkrete Umsetzungsformen einer interaktiven Wertschöpfung anhand von Praxisbeispielen vorgestellt.“Interaktive Wertschöpfung“ richtet sich an die Fachwelt in Wissenschaft und Praxis in den Bereichen Innovationsmanagement, strategisches Management, Organisation und Produktion. Prof. Dr. Prof. h. c. Dr. h. c. Ralf Reichwald ist Professor für Betriebswirtschaftslehre an der Fakultät für Wirtschaftswissenschaften und Inhaber des Lehrstuhls für Betriebswirtschaftslehre – Information, Organisation und Management (IOM) an der TU München. Dr. Frank Piller ist Privatdozent für Betriebswirtschaftslehre an der TU München und Research Fellow an der MIT Sloan School of Management, Cambridge, USA.
 
Code: And Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0
(PDF; 4,3 MB)
Autor/Herausgeber: Lawrence Lessig
Erscheinungsjahr: 2006
 
There’s a common belief that cyberspace cannot be regulated – that is, its very essence is immune from the government’s (or anyone else’s) control. „Code“, first published in 2000, argues that this belief is wrong. It is not in the nature of cyberspace to be unregulable; cyberspace has no „nature“. It only has code – the software and hardware that makes cyberspace what it is. That code can create a place of freedom – as the original architecture of the Net did – or a place of oppressive control. Under the influence of commerce, cyberspace is becoming a highly regulable space, where behaviour is much more tightly controlled than in real space. But that’s not inevitable either. We can – we must – choose what kind of cyberspace we want and what freedoms we will guarantee. These choices are all about architecture: about what kind of code will govern cyberspace, and who will control it. In this realm, code is the most significant for of law, and it is up to lawyers, policymakers, and especially citizens to decide what values that code embodies. Since its original publication, this seminal book has earned the status of a minor classic. This second edition, or Version 2.0, has been prepared through the author’s wiki, a web site that allows readers to edit the text, making this the first reader-edited revision of a popular book.
 
Democratizing Innovation
(PDF; 1,5 MB)
Autor/Herausgeber: Eric von Hippel
Erscheinungsjahr: 2005
 
Innovation is rapidly becoming democratized. Users, aided by improvements in computer and communications technology, increasingly can develop their own new products and services. These innovating users—both individuals and firms—often freely share their innovations with others, creating user-innovation communities and a rich intellectual commons. In Democratizing Innovation, Eric von Hippel looks closely at this emerging system of user-centered innovation. He explains why and when users find it profitable to develop new products and services for themselves, and why it often pays users to reveal their innovations freely for the use of all.

The trend toward democratized innovation can be seen in software and information products—most notably in the free and open-source software movement—but also in physical products. Von Hippel’s many examples of user innovation in action range from surgical equipment to surfboards to software security features. He shows that product and service development is concentrated among „lead users,“ who are ahead on marketplace trends and whose innovations are often commercially attractive.

Von Hippel argues that manufacturers should redesign their innovation processes and that they should systematically seek out innovations developed by users. He points to businesses—the custom semiconductor industry is one example—that have learned to assist user-innovators by providing them with toolkits for developing new products. User innovation has a positive impact on social welfare, and von Hippel proposes that government policies, including R&D subsidies and tax credits, should be realigned to eliminate biases against it. The goal of a democratized user-centered innovation system, says von Hippel, is well worth striving for. An electronic version of this book is available under a Creative Commons license.

 
Free Culture: How Big Media Uses Technology and the Law to Lock Down Culture and Control Creativity
(PDF; 2,6 MB)
Autor/Herausgeber: Lawrence Lessig
Erscheinungsjahr: 2004
 
Lessig looks at the disturbing legal and commercial trends that threaten to curb the incredible creative potential of the Internet. All innovations are derived from a certain amount of „piracy“ of preceding innovations, Lessig argues, and he presents a catalog of technological breakthroughs in film, music, and television as illustrations. Drawing on distinctions between piracy that benefits a single user and harms the owner and piracy that is useful in advancing new content or new ways of doing business, Lessig strongly argues for a balance between the interests of the owner and broader society so that we can continue a „free culture“ that encourages innovation rather than a „permission culture“ that does not. He reviews an array of legal actions, including the restrictions on peer-to-peer sharing made famous by Napster, and the threat they represent to the kind of openness the law has traditionally allowed and from which the marketplace has benefited. This is a highly accessible and enlightening look at the intersection of commerce, the law, and cyberspace. Vanessa Bush
 
The Future of Ideas: The Fate of the Commons in a Connected World
(PDF; 1,3 MB)
Autor/Herausgeber: Lawrence Lessig
Erscheinungsjahr: 2001
 
In The Future of Ideas, Lawrence Lessig explains how the Internet revolution has produced a counterrevolution of devastating power and effect. The explosion of innovation we have seen in the environment of the Internet was not conjured from some new, previously unimagined technological magic; instead, it came from an ideal as old as the nation. Creativity flourished there because the Internet protected an innovation commons. The Internet’s very design built a neutral platform upon which the widest range of creators could experiment. The legal architecture surrounding it protected this free space so that culture and information–the ideas of our era–could flow freely and inspire an unprecedented breadth of expression. But this structural design is changing–both legally and technically.
 
Unleashing the Ideavirus: Stop Marketing at People! Turn Your Ideas Into Epidemics by Helping Your Customers Do the Marketing for You
(PDF; 0,9 MB)
Autor/Herausgeber: Seth Godin
Erscheinungsjahr: 2000
 
Treat a product or service like a human or computer virus, contends online promotion specialist Seth Godin, and it just might become one. In Unleashing the Ideavirus, Godin describes ways to set any viable commercial concept loose among those who are most likely to catch it–and then stand aside as these recipients become infected and pass it on to others who might do the same. „The future belongs to marketers who establish a foundation and process where interested people can market to each other,“ he writes. „Ignite consumer networks and then get out of the way and let them talk.“

Godin believes that a solid idea is the best route to success in the new century, but one „that just sits there is worthless.“ Through the magic of „word of mouse,“ however, the Internet offers a unique opportunity for interested individuals to transmit ideas quickly and easily to others of like mind. Taking up where his previous book Permission Marketing left off, Godin explains in great detail how ideaviruses have been launched by companies such as Napster, Blue Mountain Arts, GeoCities, and Hotmail. He also describes „sneezers“ (influential people who spread them), „hives“ (populations most willing to receive them), and „smoothness“ (the ease with which sneezers can transmit them throughout a hive). In all, an infectious and highly recommended read.

 

Buch-Applikationen boomen im iTunes App Store

Bücher spielen auch im iPhone-Zeitalter eine wichtige Rolle. Diesen Eindruck gewinnt zumindest, wer sich die Ergebnisse einer Untersuchung von O’Reilly Research anschaut, bei der die im U.S. iTunes App Store im Zeitraum von Juli 2008 bis April 2009 angebotenen Applikationen analysiert wurden. Die Auswertungsergebnisse finden sich in dieser Präsentation:

 

Interessant ist, dass die Zahl der verfügbaren Buch-Applikationen in den letzten 3 Monaten um 285 % gestiegen ist. Es scheint angesichts der Verarbeitung von Texten relativ einfach zu sein, Buch-Applikationen zu entwickeln, was auch die Zahl von 18 Applikationen je Anbieter nahelegt:

 

via: ReadWriteWeb