Schlagwort: europa

Viviane Reding über ein digitales Europa als Ausweg aus der Krise

Viviane Reding hat am 9. Juli 2009 in ihrer Funktion als EU-Kommissarin für Informationsgesellschaft und Medien eine sehr interessante Ludwig-Erhard-Lecture zu folgendem Thema gehalten:

Digital Europe – Europe’s Fast Track to Economic Recovery

Darin sprach sie über die Chancen, welche die digitalen Medien und Technologien sowie deren meist junge Nutzer Europa bieten, um sich aus der tiefgreifenden Wirtschaftskrise zu befreien und Zukunftsfelder zu erschließen:

With these young, regular and intensive internet users, there is a whole generation of „digital natives“ ready to apply innovations like web 2.0 to business and public life, whether as podcasters, bloggers, social networkers or website owners. It is in this new generation that there is real growth potential for Europe.

Reding sagte in ihrem Vortrag zudem Bemerkenswertes zum Thema Inhalte-Piraterie:

My first and most important priority for Digital Europe is: To make it easier and more attractive to access digital content, wherever produced in Europe. The availability of attractive content that appeals to European viewers, listeners and readers will be decisive in driving further the take-up of high-speed broadband internet. It is therefore regrettable that we currently have an extremely polarised debate on the matter: While many right holders insist that every unauthorised download from the internet is a violation of intellectual property rights and therefore illegal or even criminal, others stress that access to the internet is a crucial fundamental right. Let me be clear on this: Both sides are right. The drama is that after long and often fruitless battles, both camps have now dug themselves in their positions, without any signs of opening from either side.

In the meantime, internet piracy appears to become more and more „sexy“, in particular for the digital natives already, the young generation of intense internet users between 16 and 24. This generation should become the foundation of our digital economy, of new innovation and new growth opportunities. However, Eurostat figures show that 60% of them have downloaded audiovisual content from the internet in the past months without paying. And 28% state that they would not be willing to pay.

These figures reveal the serious deficiencies of the present system. It is necessary to penalise those who are breaking the law. But are there really enough attractive and consumer-friendly legal offers on the market? Does our present legal system for Intellectual Property Rights really live up to the expectations of the internet generation? Have we considered all alternative options to repression? Have we really looked at the issue through the eyes of a 16 year old? Or only from the perspective of law professors who grew up in the Gutenberg Age? In my view, growing internet piracy is a vote of no-confidence in existing business models and legal solutions. It should be a wake-up call for policy-makers.

If we do not, very quickly, make it easier and more consumer-friendly to access digital content, we could lose a whole generation as supporters of artistic creation and legal use of digital services. Economically, socially, and culturally, this would be a tragedy.

(Die Fett-Markierung stammt von mir.)

via: EUobserver
Bild: Wikipedia

 

Update: Das Video zur Rede (47 min.)

Facebook in Europa führend – in China nicht

Heute hat comScore Zahlen zur Nutzung von Facebook in verschiedenen europäischen Ländern veröffentlicht:

Facebook Ranks as Top Social Networking Site in the Majority of European Countries

Diese zeigen sehr deutlich, wie dominant die Stellung von Facebook in Europa ist. Deutschland ist eines der wenigen Länder, in denen Facebook nicht die Nummer 1 ist:

Facebook Growth in Europe

February 2009 vs. February 2008

Total Europe, Age 15+ – Home and Work Locations

Source: comScore World Metrix

Facebook.com

Unique Visitors (000)

Feb-08

Feb-09

Percent Change

Rank in Social Networking Category in Feb-09

Europe

24,118

99,776

314%

1

United Kingdom

12,957

22,656

75%

1

France

2,217

13,698

518%

1

Turkey*

N/A

12,377

N/A

1

Italy

382

10,764

2721%

1

Spain

515

5,662

999%

1

Germany

680

3,433

405%

4

Belgium

327

2,308

607%

1

Sweden

1,211

2,298

90%

1

Denmark

533

2,022

279%

1

Switzerland

282

1,690

499%

1

Norway

819

1,479

81%

1

Finland

555

1,341

142%

1

Netherlands

236

1,031

337%

2

Austria

112

663

491%

2

Ireland

203

512

153%

2

Russia

117

478

309%

7

Portugal

72

193

169%

3

*Turkey is a newly reported individual country in comScore World Metrix; year ago data not available

 

Während also US-amerikanische Social Networks in Europa allgemein recht stark aufgestellt sind, sieht das bspw. in China deutlich anders aus. Vor kurzem hat TechCrunch hierzu einen ausführlichen Bericht veröffentlicht:

Chinese Social Networks ‘Virtually’ Out-Earn Facebook And MySpace: A Market Analysis

Dort wurde u.a. gezeigt, dass in China die heimischen Social Networking Sites den Markt dominieren:

via: Web2Asia

 

Luis Suarez: Europäer teilen ihr Wissen nicht gern

Luis Suarez arbeitet für IBM und ist dort Knowledge Manager und Botschafter für Social Software. In dem interessanten Video (s.u.) spricht er über einen ganzen Strauß an Themen wie Social Media, kollaborative Instrumente, Enterprise 2.0, den Sinn und Unsinn von E-Mails und vieles mehr.

Bemerkenswert finde ich einen Vergleich, den Suarez zwischen Europa, Asien und den USA zieht. Er sagt, dass Europäer sich im Vergleich zu anderen recht schwer tun mit dem Teilen von Wissen und Kontakten. Beides werde bei uns vielfach als Grundlage von Macht verstanden, die geschützt und abgeschirmt werden müsse, so Suarez:

There is still this notion that knowledge is power and as soon as I let my knowledge go by sharing it with others I lose my power.

Kernvoraussetzung für den Erfolg in einer Netzwerk-Gesellschaft und -Wirtschaft ist aber das Teilen. Daher könnte man diesen Kulturunterschied sogar als echten Wettbewerbsnachteil betrachten.

Suarez gibt zudem wertvolle Hinweise für all jene, die zu viele Emails bekommen und nach Alternativen suchen.

Das Video (30 min.):

via: Enterprise 2.0 Blog